Skip to content Skip to navigation

Titanium oxide nanowire as artificial photoreceptors - recent progress in retinal physiology and behavioral experiments

Zhexuan Wang, Chen Peng, Ruyi Yang, Yuqing Chen, Yuanzhi Yuan, Biao Yan, Gengfeng Zheng, Jiayi Zhan


Institutes of Brain Science, State Key Laboratory of Medical Neurobiology, MOE Frontier Center for Brain Science, Department of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200032, China
Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Chemistry, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200032, China

Purpose: Retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration are typical retinal degenerative diseases that result in irreversible loss of photoreceptors and ultimately blindness. The present study aimed to restore the visual response and visual-dependent behaviors in blind mice after subretinal implantation of gold nanoparticle-decorated titania (Au-TiO2) nanowire (NW) arrays.

Methods: We first improved the nanowire fabrication process. Responses of Retinal Ganglion Cells (RGCs) to moving bars and flashing light were recorded using patch clamp in vitro. A series of choice-box behavior tests were performed in NW arrays implanted blind mice, glass implanted blind mice and normal (C57BL/6J) mice without implantation.

Results: The photocurrent of the nanowires for UV light (375/28 nm) was 10.75 nA illuminated with a light spot of 600 µm diameter at 133 µW/mm2. RGCs responded to moving bars with spatial resolution of ~ 3°, and flashing light of at least 2 Hz. In choice box behavioral tests with moving bars and flashing lights, correct rate of blind mice implanted with Au-TiO2 NW arrays was similar to that of normal mice. RGCs responded to moving bars with spatial resolution of ~ 3°, and flashing light of at least 2 Hz. In choice box behavioral tests with moving bars and flashing lights, correct rate of blind mice implanted with Au-TiO2 NW arrays was similar to that of normal mice.

Conclusions: Au-TiO2 NW arrays restore visual responses in RGCs and visually-cued behaviors with defined spatial and temporal resolution in blind mice.

Financial disclosure: None

Go Back